endvision

Trouble shooting the Four Fields: Endvision

Four Fields  Shank

The inspiration for my Movements Diamond came from Nathan Shank’s Four Fields training on church planting movements.

Nathan begins with Endvision. What does it look like to finish the task? What does “no place left” mean for you (Rom 15:23).

When he’s equipping movement leaders these are questions Nathan asks them about their Endvision:

  • Can you accomplish your vision?
  • Working backwards, are their significant milestones on the road that can serve as temporary/this year’s goals?
  • What parts/steps toward the vision are still mysterious? Where do you need God to show up?
  • By what metrics do you measure progress toward your vision? • Is your vision big enough for your disciples to own a chunk of the vision?
  • Is your vision compelling?
  • Is your vision the kind of vision that folks would invest their life into?
  • Are your disciples talking about grandchildren in the Lord?
  • Are you the agent of your vision? Who else is needed? 

How could you use these questions? Pull them out at your next team meeting or gathering of practitioners.

Next we’ll look at how Nathan troubleshoots the Entry Field.

UPDATE: Find out more on the Four Fields in my interviews with Nathan somewhere in South Asia: The Five Parts of a CPM Plan

UPDATE: I should have mentioned that the diagnostic questions are a joint project with Nathan Shank, Jeff Sundell and Jared Houk.

 

Trouble shooting the Four Fields: Endvision

Four Fields  Shank

The inspiration for my Movements Diamond came from Nathan Shank’s Four Fields training on church planting movements.

Nathan begins with Endvision. What does it look like to finish the task? What does “no place left” mean for you (Rom 15:23).

When he’s equipping movement leaders these are questions Nathan asks them about their Endvision:

  • Can you accomplish your vision?
  • Working backwards, are their significant milestones on the road that can serve as temporary/this year’s goals?
  • What parts/steps toward the vision are still mysterious? Where do you need God to show up?
  • By what metrics do you measure progress toward your vision? • Is your vision big enough for your disciples to own a chunk of the vision?
  • Is your vision compelling?
  • Is your vision the kind of vision that folks would invest their life into?
  • Are your disciples talking about grandchildren in the Lord?
  • Are you the agent of your vision? Who else is needed? 

How could you use these questions? Pull them out at your next team meeting or gathering of practitioners.

Next we’ll look at how Nathan troubleshoots the Entry Field.

UPDATE: Find out more on the Four Fields in my interviews with Nathan somewhere in South Asia: The Five Parts of a CPM Plan

UPDATE: I should have mentioned that the diagnostic questions are a joint project with Nathan Shank, Jeff Sundell and Jared Houk.

 

1. See the end

 

See the end
This is the first in a series of posts that will unpack the Movements diagram. We'll begin with See the End.


When Jesus looked out on the crowds he was moved with compassion and urged his disciples to pray for workers. When he looked out around Galilee he saw every town and village, 175 of them, and proclaimed the gospel in everyone. He saw a world wide missionary movement and he trained workers and commissioned them to go to the ends of the earth. Jesus saw the end. He surrendered his life to God’s purposes.

 

If you don’t see it yet, don’t worry. It’s God’s mission, not yours. Peter didn’t see the mission to the Gentiles until God intervened through Cornelius. Paul didn’t see his calling to reach the nations until Jesus took him apart on the Damascus road. 

 

Eventually Paul was able to say,

From Jerusalem and all the way around to Illyricum I have fulfilled the ministry of the gospel of Christ

 

Romans 15:19b

His work was done because there churches established in major cities along the important trade routes of the eastern half of the Roman Empire. Now he was ready to go on and repeat the exercise in the west.

 

Paul knew what it looked like for his job to be done.

 

Seeing the end is a work of God. But there are some things you can do.

 

Start by obeying what God has already revealed in Scripture. You don’t need a special revelation to share the gospel and make disciples.

 

Study the Scriptures to know the heart and the will of God. Read through Acts and identify the key characteristics of a disciple making movement. Then write your own Acts 29 statement.

 

Don’t get stuck on the vision thing. Just begin Connecting, Sharing, Training, Gathering and Multiplying and God’s purposes will become clearer. We'll cover each of these in future posts.


Want to learn more? Pick up a copy of What Jesus Started and download the Implementation Guide. Find some other crazy people and get started.