Pew Research

Religious Commitment: US and W Europe compared

Pew Research

Pew Research

According to Pew Research:

The United States has a religious makeup that’s broadly similar to that of many Western European countries. Most people on both sides of the Atlantic say they are Christian, for example. At the same time, substantial shares in the U.S. and Europe say they are religiously unaffiliated: Roughly a quarter of the American adult population identify as “nones” (23%), similar to the shares in Germany (24%), the United Kingdom (23%) and other Western European countries.

At that point, however, the similarities end: U.S. adults – both Christian and unaffiliated – are considerably more religious than their European counterparts by a variety of other measures, according to an analysis of data from Pew Research Center’s 2014 U.S. Religious Landscape Study in the U.S. and a 2017 survey of Western Europeans. For instance, about two-thirds of U.S. Christians pray daily (68%), compared with a median of just 18% of Christians across 15 surveyed countries in Europe, including 6% in Britain, 9% in Germany, 12% in Denmark and 38% in the Netherlands.

Similarly, 27% of religious “nones” in the U.S. – those who describe themselves as atheist, agnostic or “nothing in particular” – believe in God with absolute certainty. Across the surveyed nations in Western Europe, however, the share of religiously unaffiliated who believe in God with absolute certainty ranges from just 1% in Austria, France, Germany and the UK to 12% in Portugal, with a regional median of 3%.

At the other end of the spectrum, Americans are much less likely than Western Europeans to say they do not believe in a higher power of any kind (10% vs. a median of 26%).

U.S. adults are also much more likely than Europeans to believe in three traits that are commonly associated with Christian notions of God: that God “loves all people regardless of their faults,” “knows everything that goes on in the world,” and “has the power to direct or change everything that goes on in the world.” About six-in-ten Americans (61%) say that God is all-powerful, for instance, while the median in Western Europe on this question is 25%. And in Denmark and Sweden, only 13% of adults say this.

Related: Christian commitment around the world

Christian commitment around the world

There shouldn't be any surprises — around the world, the Christian faith is growing fastest where levels of commitment are highest and populations are growing fastest.

The UK, Europe, Austalia, and to a lesser extent, Canada, are in trouble. In the western world, the US is the exception.

read the full report . . .

Religion in India

Five facts on religion in India from Pew Research:

  1. India’s massive population includes not only the vast majority of the world’s Hindus, but also the second-largest group of Muslims within a single country, behind only Indonesia. 
  2. India is a religiously pluralistic and multiethnic democracy – the largest in the world.
  3. Indians experience “high” levels of government restrictions on religion.
  4. India has high levels of religion-related social hostilities.
  5. Most Indians are concerned about religious tensions, but even larger shares are worried about several other national issues.

India is home to 1.4 billion people – almost one-sixth of the world’s population.

According to Pew Research, by 2050, India’s Muslim population will grow to 311 million, making it the largest Muslim population in the world.

Full story...

5 Facts on US Evangelicalism

Pew Research has marked Billy Graham's death by publishing 5 Facts on US Evangelicalism

  1. About a quarter (25.4%) of U.S. adults identify with evangelical Protestantism
  2. The evangelical Protestant share of the population has dipped slightly in recent years (from 26.3% in 2007 to 25.4% in 2014), but more slowly than the mainline Protestant and Catholic populations.
  3. Three-quarters (76%) of evangelical Protestants in the U.S. are white, but the share of evangelicals who are not white is growing.
  4. On average, evangelical Protestants have somewhat lower levels of educational attainment, compared with the U.S. public as a whole.
  5. Half (49%) of evangelical Protestant adults reside in the South, which is home to 37% of the overall U.S. adult population.

Christians in Europe — more dying than being born

iStock_000006490887Medium.jpg

According to Pew Research Christians remained the largest religious group in the world in 2015, making up nearly a third (31%) of Earth’s 7.3 billion people. But the number of Christians in Europe, is in decline.

But among Christians in Europe deaths outnumbered births by nearly 6 million from 2010 to 2015. In Germany alone, there were an estimated 1.4 million more Christian deaths than births.

Demographics is destiny. Unless you start winning Europeans who are far from God.

The spread of the world's Muslim population

As of 2010, there were an estimated 1.6 billion Muslims around the world, making Islam the world’s second-largest religious tradition after Christianity.
Although many people, especially in the United States, may associate Islam with countries in the Middle East or North Africa, nearly two-thirds (62%) of Muslims live in the Asia-Pacific region, according to the Pew Research Center analysis.
More Muslims live in India and Pakistan (344 million combined) than in the entire Middle East-North Africa region (317 million).
more >>