North Korea

North Korea to release Australian missionary

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North Korea says it will release and deport a 75-year-old Australian missionary detained since last month for allegedly distributing religious materials.

John Short was arrested after leaving “Bible tracts’’ in a Buddhist temple in the capital Pyongyang during a tour, the North’s state-run KCNA news agency said.

They are also holding US citizen Kenneth Bae, described by a North Korean court as a militant Christian evangelist.

He was arrested in November 2012 and sentenced to 15 years’ hard labour on charges of seeking to topple the government.

North Korea to release Australian missionary

515441 d94573bc a26a 11e3 8534 2426eac7dfe0

North Korea says it will release and deport a 75-year-old Australian missionary detained since last month for allegedly distributing religious materials.

John Short was arrested after leaving “Bible tracts’’ in a Buddhist temple in the capital Pyongyang during a tour, the North’s state-run KCNA news agency said.

They are also holding US citizen Kenneth Bae, described by a North Korean court as a militant Christian evangelist.

He was arrested in November 2012 and sentenced to 15 years’ hard labour on charges of seeking to topple the government.

Pray for John Short and for the people of North Korea

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He’s courageous, this is my husband’s character. I hope things get better -- he's in God's hands, we both totally believe that.

Karen Short

A South Australian man has been detained in North Korea for distributing religious material.

John Short, 75, a former member of the Unley and Elizabeth Global Hall Brethren, was arrested by the public security bureau of North Korea on Sunday and faces 15 years in jail under the harsh regime of Kim Jong-un.

He has been questioned in Pyongyang, the North Korean capital and its largest city, about religious pamphlets printed in the Korean language and believed to be in his possession.

According to a recent United Nations report North Korea’s leaders should be brought before an international court for a litany of crimes against humanity that include exterminating its population.

A hard-hitting report on the nuclear-armed totalitarian state also strongly criticised its denial of basic freedoms of thought, expression and religion, and its abduction of citizens of neighbouring South Korea and Japan.

“Systemic, widespread and gross human rights violations have been and are being committed by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, its institutions and officials,’’ said the report by the Commission of Inquiry on North Korea set up in March 2013 by the UN Human Rights Council.

“In many instances, the violations of human rights found by the commission constitute crimes against humanity. These are not mere excesses of the state; they are essential components of a political system that has moved far from the ideals on which it claims to be founded,’’ the report said.

“The gravity, scale and nature of these violations revealed a state that does not have any parallel in the contemporary world.’’

 

Pray for John Short and for the people of North Korea

820569 156335ea 992a 11e3 ae2a c06439f32ae2

He’s courageous, this is my husband’s character. I hope things get better -- he's in God's hands, we both totally believe that.

Karen Short

A South Australian man has been detained in North Korea for distributing religious material.

John Short, 75, a former member of the Unley and Elizabeth Global Hall Brethren, was arrested by the public security bureau of North Korea on Sunday and faces 15 years in jail under the harsh regime of Kim Jong-un.

He has been questioned in Pyongyang, the North Korean capital and its largest city, about religious pamphlets printed in the Korean language and believed to be in his possession.

According to a recent United Nations report North Korea’s leaders should be brought before an international court for a litany of crimes against humanity that include exterminating its population.

A hard-hitting report on the nuclear-armed totalitarian state also strongly criticised its denial of basic freedoms of thought, expression and religion, and its abduction of citizens of neighbouring South Korea and Japan.

“Systemic, widespread and gross human rights violations have been and are being committed by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, its institutions and officials,’’ said the report by the Commission of Inquiry on North Korea set up in March 2013 by the UN Human Rights Council.

“In many instances, the violations of human rights found by the commission constitute crimes against humanity. These are not mere excesses of the state; they are essential components of a political system that has moved far from the ideals on which it claims to be founded,’’ the report said.

“The gravity, scale and nature of these violations revealed a state that does not have any parallel in the contemporary world.’’