Church health

New Directions

Newdirections

I was in Tasmania last week. Spent some time with the good people at New Directions.

We debriefed their Natural Church Development profile. Celebrations all around. New Directions is one of the healthiest churches in Australia, and it shows.

I sat in their cafe and watched local high school students pass through on the way to mentoring and training in personal development.

I watched families from the community bring their children to celebrate their birthday parties in Kid's Paradise — choice of Pirate or Princess themes.

Thousands of people pass through every week.

I met with the leadership team. They love their church. I heard their stories of people coming to faith and growing in Christ.

With so much confusion about “What is the church?” and “What is mission?” and What is the gospel?“, it was nice to be in a place where they just got on with being the church and doing mission and proclaiming the gospel.

And planting churches.

New Directions is one of those instant successes that has taken a decade or more of hard work and faith to pull off. Well done guys.

Skyping Liam

LiamHad a great Skype conversation with Liam Glover the other day. That's Liam without the hair and me in the tiny box. Skype video adds a lot to the relational dynamic of a call. I'm running the v2 beta on a MacBook.

Back to Liam. He's leading the pack in applying the NCD health paradigm to church planting: NxCD. Liam is a planter and an effective practitioner of what he preaches.

He's also passionate about church planting and NCD and does a good job of coaching planters. I think he's onto something.

Liam gets the church plants to do two NCD surveys in their first year and then coaches them around their minimum factor/s. They do the survey even if they only have half a dozen on their team. The proof is in the pudding and Liam is seeing some encouraging outcomes in his work with planters.

If you're a church planter and an early adopter (is that a tautology?), I'd be ordering a NxCD pack and trying it out. They've worked out a great deal on the cost to encourage church planting.

Hoping to partner with Liam and train some NxCD coaches early 2007 for the next1000 initiative.

Hope to have the next1000 website launched by November and with it a new ebook on how we're going to plant the next1000 Aussie churches. Stay tuned.

Church GrowthChurch PlantingNatural Church DevelopmentNext1000

Skyping Liam

LiamHad a great Skype conversation with Liam Glover the other day. That's Liam without the hair and me in the tiny box. Skype video adds a lot to the relational dynamic of a call. I'm running the v2 beta on a MacBook.

Back to Liam. He's leading the pack in applying the NCD health paradigm to church planting: NxCD. Liam is a planter and an effective practitioner of what he preaches.

He's also passionate about church planting and NCD and does a good job of coaching planters. I think he's onto something.

Liam gets the church plants to do two NCD surveys in their first year and then coaches them around their minimum factor/s. They do the survey even if they only have half a dozen on their team. The proof is in the pudding and Liam is seeing some encouraging outcomes in his work with planters.

If you're a church planter and an early adopter (is that a tautology?), I'd be ordering a NxCD pack and trying it out. They've worked out a great deal on the cost to encourage church planting.

Hoping to partner with Liam and train some NxCD coaches early 2007 for the next1000 initiative.

Hope to have the next1000 website launched by November and with it a new ebook on how we're going to plant the next1000 Aussie churches. Stay tuned.

Church GrowthChurch PlantingNatural Church DevelopmentNext1000

The trouble with Melbourne Anglicans

800Px-Interior Of St Pauls Melb02 The Melbourne diocese of the Anglican church is in trouble. Whether they know it is another question. But they are in trouble.

In 1981 there 235 Melbourne parishes. Today there are 216, a loss of 19. In the same time period average Sunday attendance has fallen from 50,000 to 29,000.

40% of those attending are over 60 years old, only 11% are under 30. Currently only 6% of active clergy are under 35, while 59% are over 50.

That's not decline, it's disaster.

Peter Corney has come up with a vision and a plan to renew the Melbourne diocese. It's realistic, and by faith, achievable.

If you're a Melbourne Anglican you must read it. If you're not, it's still a great example of an effective strategy for the renewal of any denomination.

All you need to do is add leadership. . .

Future Of The Diocese Of Melbourne - Corney

Thanks to Alan Hirsch for passing on the report. Still waiting for your blog to launch!

Alan HirschAnglican

The trouble with Melbourne Anglicans

800Px-Interior Of St Pauls Melb02 The Melbourne diocese of the Anglican church is in trouble. Whether they know it is another question. But they are in trouble.

In 1981 there 235 Melbourne parishes. Today there are 216, a loss of 19. In the same time period average Sunday attendance has fallen from 50,000 to 29,000.

40% of those attending are over 60 years old, only 11% are under 30. Currently only 6% of active clergy are under 35, while 59% are over 50.

That's not decline, it's disaster.

Peter Corney has come up with a vision and a plan to renew the Melbourne diocese. It's realistic, and by faith, achievable.

If you're a Melbourne Anglican you must read it. If you're not, it's still a great example of an effective strategy for the renewal of any denomination.

All you need to do is add leadership. . .

Future Of The Diocese Of Melbourne - Corney

Thanks to Alan Hirsch for passing on the report. Still waiting for your blog to launch!

Alan HirschAnglican

Hope Chapel, Hawaii: How do they do it?

Ralph Moore - Hope Chapel Founder

In 2001 Hope Chapel sent out one quarter of its congregation (350 people) to start two new churches. . . two weeks before moving into a new building. Since then, they've planted at least one new church a year by hiving off 100 to 150 people each time. One of the new churches is now about 600, with the smallest just over 100.

In the meantime one of Hope's daughter churches planted four more churches in Japan. Other daughter churches continue to plant, in Hawaii, Japan, the Philippines, and New England. In New England the lineage goes seven generations deep and they've become a movement of their own with nearly 20 churches planted.

In Japan Hope Chapel has 19 church starts. Their goal is to see 100 in the next twelve years. They also believe the entire movement could reach 1000 churches by that time (currently 300).

How does Hope Chapel do it?

They look primarily among “minichurch leaders”— those who demonstrate fruitfulness in evangelism, discipleship, and multiplying leaders in a small group setting.

The leadership team prayerfully consider these people for church planting. Those who express an interest when approached are gathered into small groups for focused leadership development before being sent out to plant churches.

Source: Bob Logan, Be Fruitful and Multiply, 25-26.

Tell me, what is Hope Chapel doing that 99% of other flagship churches couldn't do? Maybe they're just got it easier than the rest of us. I mean anyone can plant churches in Japan!


“Starting a New Church: The Church Planter's Guide to Success” (Ralph Moore)